William Trost Richards

William Trost Richards

William Trost Richards (1833–1905) was a dynamic American landscape artist associated both with the Hudson River School and the American Pre-Raphaelites. Richards first showed his work in 1858 at an exhibition held in New Bedford, Massachusetts which had been organized by Albert Bierstadt. In the 1870s, he produced numerous watercolor views of the White Mountains. Richards exhibited at the National Academy of Design from 1861 to 1899, and at the Brooklyn Art Association from 1863 to 1885. He was elected a full member of the National Academy in 1871. Richards is noted as a proponent of realism because his works are known for their meticulously rendered details. In later years, Richards focused on marine watercolors, and he is to this day considered one of America’s most accomplished marine painters.


William Trost Richards (1833–1905) Peaceful Shore, 1870
Oil on canvas, 14 ½ x 26 1/16 inches
Signed and dated lower right: Wm T. Richards. 1870.

 


William Trost Richards (1833–1905) Tennyson’s Farm, Farringford, Isle of Wight, 1880
Watercolor and gouache on paper, 9 3/16 x 13 11/16 inches (sight size)
Signed and dated lower right: Wm. T. Richards. 1880; initialed, dated, and titled on verso: W. T. R. / 1880 / Tennyson’s Farm, Faringford / Isle of Wight

Images courtesy of Questroyal Fine Art, LLC