Thomas Hiram Hotchkiss

Thomas Hiram Hotchkiss

Thomas Hiram Hotchkiss (ca. 1834–1869) is considered one of the most inventive and expressive landscape painters of his generation. He was born near Hudson, New York, and was active in New York City where he was a member of the American National Academy and exhibited at the National Academy of Design. A friend of Asher B. Durand and John Rollin Tilton, he first rose to prominence in the late 1850s, traveling and depicting regions such as the White Mountains, before moving to Italy in 1860 to study and paint. He was an active and important member of the vibrant artistic and literary circles of American expatriates in Rome. His unsurpassed draftsmanship, colorism, and handling of light effects, notably in his paintings and watercolors of the Italian landscape and its important ancient monuments and sites, encapsulate the experiences and wonderment of Americans traveling nationally and abroad. Hotchkiss is appreciated for merging the best of American and European traditions and techniques of painting.


Thomas Hiram Hotchkiss (1833–1869) Mount Washington, 1857
Oil on canvas, 20⅛ x 30 inches
Collection New-York Historical Society, New York, NY, The Robert L. Stuart Collection, on permanent loan from the New York Public Library, S-5