George Inness

George Inness

About the time of the Centennial, the popularity of the Hudson River School was on the wane, subsumed by other genres and styles of art. After the Civil War, the aesthetic orientation of the United States shifted from Great Britain to France. Collectors and critics began to favor the spontaneous naturalism of the Barbizon school, with its advocacy of complete plein-air painting and emphasis on realism, loose brushwork, and lyrical, intimate settings. In addition, Americans began to favor figure painting over that of landscape. By the 1880s, George Inness  (1825–1894), was the most famous landscape painter in America, successfully adapted the styles of the Old Masters and the Barbizon School to particularly American scenery. Inness’s later works, with their high level of individual expression and deep spiritualism, influenced by Swedenborgian theology, made him a leading figure of the Tonalist style during the final decades of the nineteenth century.


George Inness (1825–1894) Monte Lucia, Perugia, 1873
Oil on canvas, 13 7/8 x 19 3/4 inches
Signed lower right: G. Inness; inscribed on verso label: No. 161 13 ¾ x 19 ½ 1873 Monte Lucia, Perugia Italy

 


George Inness (1825–1894) Nine O’clock, 1891
Oil on canvas, 30 1/16 x 45 1/8 inches
Signed and dated lower right: G. Inness 1891.

Images courtesy of Questroyal Fine Art, LLC