Hudson River School

Introduction

This site is dedicated to an in-depth exploration of The Hudson River School, America’s first true movement in American art. The school consisted of an ever-evolving fraternity of painters who helped shape the dominant vision of the American landscape from approximately 1825 to 1875. This loose-knit group of artists based in New York, along with several contemporary writers and poets who rose to prominence during the nineteenth century, hoped to define a particularly “American” voice via an intensive artistic and literary exploration of Nature. The Hudson River School celebrated the glorious lands of the Hudson River Valley and beyond, forging a unique vision of the vast potential of a country that was in the process of identifying itself. Read More

Recent News

How Do You Like Them Apples?

Angela | October 1st, 2014 | Posted in Essays
Prentice-Apples-in-a-Basket-648x424

These days, the word “apple” is more likely to bring to mind the iPhone 6 rather than a juicy honeycrisp or macoun. However, New York native Levi Wells Prentice Read more…

The Original “Glamping”: The Adirondack Great Camps

Nina Sangimino | September 5th, 2014 | Posted in Essays
Adirondack Great Camp, Camp Pine Knot, ca 1885, photograph, Adirondack Museum

You may have heard of “glamping,” a trendy way for the glitterati to experience the wilderness without sacrificing any of the luxuries of a 5-star resort, but did you know that this practice has actually been around since the mid-nineteenth century? Read more…

USPS Releases Hudson River School Stamps

Alison Kowalski | August 22nd, 2014 | Posted in News
Thomas Cole Stamp

In recent years, the United States Post Office has produced limited edition stamps featuring important American paintings, including the work of Albert Bierstadt, Winslow Homer, and Edward Hopper. The most recent release in the American Treasures series depicts Hudson River School paintings from major museum collections. Read more…

Pennsylvania’s Beauty: Visiting the Poconos

Chelsea DeLay | July 30th, 2014 | Posted in Essays
Ralph Albert Blakelock (1847–1919), Pawpack Falls, Hawley, Pennsylvania. Oil on canvas, 42½ x 30½ inches. Signed lower right: RA. Blakelock.

Working with nineteenth-century American landscape paintings on a daily basis offers the unique opportunity to examine the appearance of landmarks in present day and consider how time has changed from when they were Read more…

Exploring Maine’s Appeal: Landscapes and Lobsters

Chelsea DeLay | July 24th, 2014 | Posted in Essays
Photo by Shannon Cassell

During the nineteenth century, awareness of Maine’s striking landscape was raised in part due to the first generation of Hudson River School artists. The coastal towns and Read more…